Blackjack – The Red Seven Count Part2

I asked him to simulate the Red Seven Count, exactly as I had published it, with only six strategy changes, all made by running count, in two common games (at that time), and to compare the Red Seven results with two versions of the Hi-Lo Count, as published by Stanford Wong in Professional Blackjack, one version utilizing all 184 indices by true count, and one using Wong’s condensed -6 to +6 version (34 indices) by true count.

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Unbalanced Blackjack Systems

In 1969, a Berkeley math professor, using the pseudonym “Jacques Noir,” wrote a book called Casino Holiday, which contained an “unbalanced” ten count system which required no true count conversions. Within a few years, more refined versions of Noir’s running count system were published by Stanley Roberts, and then John Archer. The power of the Noir count derives from its built-in imbalance, which makes it very simple to play. Tens are counted as -2, and all non-tens, including aces, are counted as +1.

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Balanced Vs. Unbalanced Counting Blackjack Systems

In casino blackjack, high cards—tens and aces—are favorable to you, the player, and low cards—2s through 7s—are favorable to the dealer. With more tens and aces in the deck, more blackjacks will be dealt, and even though these Blackjacks will be evenly distributed between you and the dealer, you get paid 3 to 2 for your blackjack, while the dealer only gets 1 to 1—the amount of your original bet. In addition, more tens and aces mean that you will have more double-down wins and that the dealer will bust more often since the dealer must hit all hands of 16 or less, even when you are stiff.

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